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#166114 - 07/18/12 12:14 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Easiest way to test Midi input signal
bowlesj Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 07/01/12
Posts: 359
Hi,

I will be buying BIAB/RB soon. I am also buying a used Roland GK-3 pickup system to feed my guitar to a Roland GR-1 Synth to do the Midi Interface conversion (I am buying these because I am getting a great deal and I am only interested in getting my notes into BIAB rather than having a great synth). I have a 5 year old computer running XP that has USB 2.0 capable ports. It is running a "RealTek HD Audio Manager software and it shows MSI on the top because the mother board is MSI". I do not see any mention of MIDI on the Audio Manager. The seller of the GR-1 says I can simply buy a Midi-to-USB converter since the GR-1 output is only 5-pin midi. At the same time I am aware there are PCI boards or sound cards that have Midi input. So I am not sure if BIAB running on my computer will pick up the Midi signal from the GR-1. To deal with this and make the final GR-1 purchase decision, I am thinking of downloading BIAB (I assume there is a trial period), taking my computer to the sellers place, firing it up and seeing if I can get all 6 guitar strings to feed into BIAB on my computer. I am wondering what is the simplest thing I can do to test the Midi signal is coming in to BIAB.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
John
_________________________
John Bowles
My playing in my 20s:
https://www.reverbnation.com/johnbowles

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#166115 - 07/18/12 12:41 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: bowlesj]
oublaj Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 01/14/10
Posts: 27
Loc: Glens Falls, NY
A USB midi interface will work fine for you. Download midi- ox to test the signal.

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#166116 - 07/18/12 12:58 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: oublaj]
bowlesj Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 07/01/12
Posts: 359
Thanks Oubia

I was not aware of this utility so I am reading the Midi-ox web page now.
http://www.midiox.com/
Google also uncovered a page on how to use it to test the input device.
http://avid.force.com/pkb/articles/en_US...mp;DocType=1078

The above link says to make sure the proper Midi drivers are installed.
I am wondering what software supplies the Midi drivers that detect a Midi device is sending data to the USB?
1/ Win XP when it detects the GR-1 is plugged into the USB.
2/ Band In A Box
3/ The GR-1 (which was probably built before USB existed).


I also found this support page which may come in handy the day of the test.
Band-in-a-Box for Windows - No Sound / Driver Setup
http://www.pgmusic.com/tutorial_bbw_nosound.htm

John


Edited by bowlesj (07/18/12 01:56 PM)

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#166117 - 07/18/12 05:53 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: bowlesj]
megafiddle Offline
Apprentice

Registered: 07/08/12
Posts: 103
Loc: Fred'burg VA
Quote:

I am wondering what software supplies the Midi drivers that detect a Midi device is sending data to the USB?
1/ Win XP when it detects the GR-1 is plugged into the USB.
2/ Band In A Box
3/ The GR-1 (which was probably built before USB existed).

John




If I understand your question, there is no separate or additional software to detect the presence of midi data. Once the drivers are installed, the midi interface will show up in the list of drivers, for example, in the midi options of BIAB. To use it, you simply select it as your input driver.

Then it is the particular application or program like BIAB or midiox that reads the midi data in if commanded to do so (switching on 'Record' in BIAB, for example).

When a USB midi interface is plugged into a PC, Windows will detect that the USB device is present. But Windows has no use for any midi data that may be present. It's up to a program like BIAB to read the data in.

Actually, it may not even be possible to tell if a midi device like a keyboard or midi guitar is connected unless it is transmitting data.

In the case of a USB midi interface, the driver will be supplied with the interface.
Many sound cards have the midi signals present on the game port. And midi drivers would then be present along with the sound and game port drivers. But an interface cable was still required to use the game port midi signals.

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#166118 - 07/18/12 08:48 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: megafiddle]
bowlesj Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 07/01/12
Posts: 359
Hi megafiddle,

Thanks for your response. For me as a programmer this is an interesting topic.

Quote:


When a USB midi interface is plugged into a PC, Windows will detect that the USB device is present. But Windows has no use for any midi data that may be present. It's up to a program like BIAB to read the data in.





Yes I was thinking along this line after I posted. Win XP will have drivers for the USB device itself and for certain devices plugged in like a USB drive. But midi is a string of data coming in as you say (and as I have been learning over the last few weeks).

Quote:


Actually, it may not even be possible to tell if a midi device like a keyboard or midi guitar is connected unless it is transmitting data.




Yeah, I am not sure either. I think if a device such as the GR-1 is written to the Windows Plug-And-Play standard it may detect it as soon as it is plugged in. But I do not think this is necessary to operate.

I brought google in to this.
Quote:


http://download.yamaha.com/usb_midi/index.html
The USB-MIDI driver is software that transfers MIDI data back and forth between PC software and Yamaha USB-MIDI devices.




So this means that this particular driver knows where to get the Midi data on a USB device and presents it in a standard way for the Software so that the software does not need to know if it is the USB 1.2 standard or the USB 2.0 standard or any other new standard. It may even mean that Yamaha supplies the driver because it is doing something special related to the USB device and the driver converts it to the Midi standard so the software like BIAB does not need to know all this stuff.

Quote:


In the case of a USB midi interface, the driver will be supplied with the interface.




Yes this matches exactly the quote above about the Yamaha Midi USB driver. (I am thinking on the fly here) Yamaha supplies a Midi Interface (much like the Roland GI-20 for example which is a midi interface) and you get a CD with this purchase that supplies the USB midi drivers to do the conversion to a Midi standard for the BIAB software. Not only that, the part of the Midi driver that BIAB sees does not tell BIAB whether the midi data is coming from USB or Midi-5pin on a sound card or Midi-5pin located on a special PCI card. The Midi-Driver tells the Win-XP operating system where to look for this midi data which it will supply to BIAB. To add to this even more, I found a special Midi-driver in my goggle searches that allows Midi software to talk to other Midi software (no hardware involved at all and only the driver knows where the two parties involved are). So that leads directly to my question. The GR-1 is a Roland synthesizer which also has a Midi Interface built in (midi interface meaning a hardware that converts the GK-3 guitar pickup signals to Midi data) But the Roland GR-3 is old and has no USB plug (only Midi 5 pin). So it therefore can not provide a Midi USB driver (unless one was written after the fact which I highly doubt since Roland will want you to buy something new like the GR-33 which was the first synth with a USB output). Okay so if the old GR-1 does work if it is redirected to a USB port this probably means that windows XP likely provides a very basic standard Midi USB driver by default and when the converter cable is plugged in to the Roland GR-1 box to convert the Midi-5-pin to a USB on the other side and you plug this into the computer USB port then the Windows XP supplied Midi USB driver does the job (long sentence, sorry about that).

I am now turning to (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIDI). It gets into the RTP-Midi standard which is used for computers. It appears MS-Windows had a big influence on Midi Standards once things moved to computers. So although I have not found anything that suggests that Win XP is supplying a default midi driver for the USB port I would not be surprised. It may be that once it detects that a Midi device is there using the "Plug-and-Play" standard that has been around since 1980-something if it can not find a driver supplied by the Midi Interface manufacturer like Roland/Yamaha or whatever, then Win XP supplies it and that is what BIAB sees as you described in your message. Most users would not even realize this since most would have used a Midi device with a USB plug and the USB driver already installed before they even plug in the device. For the very few such as myself wanting to use an older machine such as the Roland GR-1 they may install it without even thinking about this and not notice that Win XP supplied the basic Midi USB driver. The only other thing I can think might be happening if maybe the MIDI-to-USB converter cable has a driver build in somehow and it gets loaded. I guess I will find out when I try it :-)


Edited by bowlesj (07/18/12 09:08 PM)

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#166119 - 07/18/12 10:24 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: bowlesj]
megafiddle Offline
Apprentice

Registered: 07/08/12
Posts: 103
Loc: Fred'burg VA
Modules and instruments that use the 5 pin mini din connector generally don't supply drivers as anything that they might plug into would presumably already have the necessary hardware and drivers. Since the 5 pin midi connector was not standard on PC's, any PC that had one, would have also had the interface hardware and driver. And of course, another instrument with a 5 pin midi in would already be set up to receive midi data. I think though, the Atari 520ST computer did have midi in and out connectors.

The Roland GI-20 and GR-3 are more properly described as guitar to midi converters. "Interface" is not totally wrong though. It's a pretty general term.

And that's basically correct about the drivers. The driver takes care of all the little details that are specific to the particular device so that Windows has a standard way of communicating, controlling, etc, devices from different makers. The operating system (windows) then presents applications with a standard, uniform software interface to the device.

XP and other versions do have generic versions of drivers for some things, but I don't know if any had a generic driver for USB midi. If I'm not mistaken, midi capability was originally added to the game port to provide music and sound effects for games. This was when PC's only had maybe 4 megabytes memory. No room for wave files.

Also, the midi spec also required that the signals be electrically isolated between the transmitter and receiver. The signal at the 5 pin connector uses opto-isolators and a grounded shield that is only connected at the transmitting end. This was done to prevent ground loops as audio signals were often present in the same instument. That's why it could be impossible to detect if a midi instrument is connected. If it's not transmitting data, the midi connection looks like an open circuit.
An exception could be if the instrument were transmitting 'active sensing' bytes. In this case, there would be a steady stream of data.

By the way, what kinds of programming do you do?


Edited by megafiddle (07/18/12 10:30 PM)

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#166120 - 07/19/12 06:47 AM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: megafiddle]
bowlesj Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 07/01/12
Posts: 359
Hi megafiddle,

To answer your programming question, I started programming Cobol, assembler, RPG and PL1 when I was 26 after I left teaching guitar. I was basically programming for business apps. I learned about 11 languages in total including Unix shell programming. I left that job after having learned VBA for MS-Access mostly. I left to trade the markets so now I program in a language called EasyLangauge which is used in MultiCharts and TradeStation. I still to a lot of VBA since my database app communicates with MultiCharts via global variables. I never learned C language which is likely the language used to program these midi drives etc. So therefore I am not up on all the Windows system calls as a C programmer would be. It is just that over the years (I am 58) I have caught on to some of the basic stuff going on with windows (especially having worked with tech support people for 19 years). If I had only played guitar for 22 years (as I have) I would be 100% lost on this midi drivers topic. The 32 years working with computers helps me know how to design some of the Google searches, reformat disk drives to install windows, etc. You might have guessed there was a period of overlap where I was still teaching guitar while programming. Returning to playing guitar has been a treat for me (discovering this whole new music world which I totally missed).

How about yourself, what is your background that gives you the knowledge that you have?

UPDATE: The stuff below may be a bit out of date. I just found a link below that mentioned something I suspected before which is that the "USB Midi 5Pin adaptor" may supply the Midi driver built in.
http://www.musicmasterworks.com/midi_cable.html
So I just have to make sure I get a good one. I still need to follow the procedure below however.

So I think I know what I have to do now regarding buying the GR-1.
1/ Find a music store that has a "Midi-5pin to USB adaptor" which I can return if I need to.
2/ Download both Midi-OX and BIAB to learn how to do the test for the signal at the USB. Learn how to select the Midi driver and to do a basic recording of midi input I guess.
3/ When I feel ready to test the GR-1, take the computer and do the tests for all 6 guitar strings, etc. I also will need to take the windows install CDs just incase windows detects the GR-1 via Plug-and-play protocol (or whatever) and asks me to insert the CD so it can install a generic driver for midi. I should also take the middle trouble shooting sheet at the link above to see if I can play around if the above does not work.

Thanks again for responding. You got me thinking through things I have not thought about for a long time.

John

P.S. So some might be asking, why not just buy a Midi interface or Guitar Synth with USB (like GI-20, GR-33 etc). The thing is I can not justify spending the money because I realized a probably will not have much time to write music and record it into BIAB using midi. I am only getting a hour in a day now just to maintain my guitar playing. However I can justify this used stuff and it may get me allocating more time to BIAB as I gradually learn it. Its a start. Hopefully my business will get less busy in the future.


Edited by bowlesj (07/19/12 07:39 AM)
_________________________
John Bowles
My playing in my 20s:
https://www.reverbnation.com/johnbowles

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#166121 - 07/19/12 07:34 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: bowlesj]
megafiddle Offline
Apprentice

Registered: 07/08/12
Posts: 103
Loc: Fred'burg VA
I've been playing around with computers and midi since the '80s. Also started programming back then, first in BASIC then FORTRAN and Assembly. When many of the engineers at that previous job started using C, I figured I may as well learn that one too. Its the only language I've used since. I have just an occasional use for programming at my current job now though. Do most of it at home learning 32 bit windows programming. I think the sane people are using C++. But C does everything I need it to do. Right now I'm concentrating on the graphics functions and drawing fractals.
(search internet for "Mandelbrot set")

Anyway my first midi setup was a Casio CZ5000 keyboard, Commodore64 computer and a DR T sequencer. Later I moved up to an Atari 520ST and MasterTracks sequencer. Mainly I play bass and just fool around with guitar and keyboards. So I had no way of playing anything into a sequence. Had to use event list editing and entering notes with the mouse. But I managed to put together some short good sounding sequences. Too much work though. Also wrote some software for editing and managing patches in the old DX7 keyboard. And now it's the PC and BIAB and PowerTracks

I've been using BIAB for working out chords to songs I was learning bass for. And printing out chord sheets. Trying to learn all the little things now to get a good sounding song going for playing some electric guitar and bass.

As oubla said above, the USB midi should work fine. Get that setup before you run BIAB.
Then when you run BIAB for the first time, you will get a window for setting up the midi input and output devices. You don't need a connection to a 5 pin midi device at all at that point. Just need the USB midi plugged in to the PC. The USB midi adaptor should appear in the lists of input and output devices. Then you just need to select it.
The instuctions for midiox should tell you exactly how to select the USB midi adaptor for it's use also. And again you don't need the GR-1 connected at that point.

If you know someone with one of those little Casio or Yamaha keyboards, many had midi outputs, and you could use that to test things before heading over to check out the GR-1. I would expect no problems though.

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#166122 - 07/20/12 06:34 AM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: megafiddle]
bowlesj Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 07/01/12
Posts: 359
I am curious. Did you play bass before you started Midi or the other way around? It would be interesting to find someone who got interested in Midi before playing an instrument unless they were already a programmer and assigned that type of job.

Quote:


As oubla said above, the USB midi should work fine. Get that setup before you run BIAB.
Then when you run BIAB for the first time, you will get a window for setting up the midi input and output devices. You don't need a connection to a 5 pin midi device at all at that point. Just need the USB midi plugged in to the PC. The USB midi adaptor should appear in the lists of input and output devices. Then you just need to select it.
The instuctions for midiox should tell you exactly how to select the USB midi adaptor for it's use also. And again you don't need the GR-1 connected at that point.

If you know someone with one of those little Casio or Yamaha keyboards, many had midi outputs, and you could use that to test things before heading over to check out the GR-1. I would expect no problems though.




Thanks megafiddle,
So I am assuming that you are referring to the "Midi 5 to USB adapter" that automatically loads the Midi Driver. To me this seems like that would have been the best way to go (see below).

Having said that, here is the funny (and a bit annoying part) which I just found out yesterday. The person selling it has a link to a web page showing the Roland GK-3 guitar pickup. That is the one I wanted. But a bit later I take a closer look at the picture and it shows a Roland GK-2A. I first emailed him asking if he was selling both. He said no, just the GR-2A. I emailed him saying I had to think about the purchase of a GK-2A. He responded and said "they are the same thing". I am thinking "Yeah right!". So I research it (thank god for google). The big difference was that GR-3 comes with a bracket for the tune-o-matic guitar bridge and the GK-2A does not have this. I have a tune-o-matic so I have decided against the deal. I find it amazing he would put that link to the GK-3 in and I am glad I took the time to look at the picture (I did not initially because I knew that GK-3 well but later I took a closer look at the small picture and noticed it looked a bit different). Just imagine if myself or someone else took the 20+ minute trek to his place only to find he misrepresented his sale. Some people would go from annoyed to very angry. So he wastes a lot of people's time including on this thread. When someone reasizes what he is doing are they going to trust his GR-1 is in as good condition as he says? Anyway, I learned a lot about Midi because of it which is good. If I had just bought a Roland GI-20 with a USB plug I would not have learned as much about Midi.


Edited by bowlesj (07/20/12 06:51 AM)

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#166123 - 07/20/12 07:19 AM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: bowlesj]
Mac Offline
Veteran

Registered: 05/29/00
Posts: 38502
Loc: Chesapeake, Virginia USA
Quote:

Hi,

I will be buying BIAB/RB soon. I am also buying a used Roland GK-3 pickup system to feed my guitar to a Roland GR-1 Synth to do the Midi Interface conversion (I am buying these because I am getting a great deal and I am only interested in getting my notes into BIAB rather than having a great synth). I have a 5 year old computer running XP that has USB 2.0 capable ports. It is running a "RealTek HD Audio Manager software and it shows MSI on the top because the mother board is MSI". I do not see any mention of MIDI on the Audio Manager. The seller of the GR-1 says I can simply buy a Midi-to-USB converter since the GR-1 output is only 5-pin midi. At the same time I am aware there are PCI boards or sound cards that have Midi input. So I am not sure if BIAB running on my computer will pick up the Midi signal from the GR-1. To deal with this and make the final GR-1 purchase decision, I am thinking of downloading BIAB (I assume there is a trial period), taking my computer to the sellers place, firing it up and seeing if I can get all 6 guitar strings to feed into BIAB on my computer. I am wondering what is the simplest thing I can do to test the Midi signal is coming in to BIAB.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
John




Roland GK with GR-1 is the setup I have used for years with Band in a Box.

The only other thing you would need other than the BiaB program and the Windows computer would be a MIDI to computer device such as the USB device type already mentioned here. There are two types of these devices available, one type uses its own driver software which must be installed first, no big deal, and the other type is "class compliant" -- meaning no drivers need be installed by you as the Windows Operating System will detect that device automaically upon plug in. Either works about as well as the other, no gain by picking one over the other as far as performance goes. PGMusic sells a class compliant USB MIDI adaptor on this website, see the sales pages, hardware for more info.

The Roland GK pickup is fairly nice, a few tips are in order though.

*Most guitar players initially try to play the MIDI pickup as if it were the acoustic guitar. My advice is not to expect it to perform like that, after all, if we needed to record a guitar, it would be far simpler to use Audio and record from the guitar pickup. Instead, concentrate on the pickup's ability to fire MIDI patches of the instruments that are NOT guitars in the MIDI lineup: Pianos, Electric Pianos, Organs, Horns, etc.

*However, when using the MIDI pickup to enter notation for such purposes as guitar teaching or creating guitar parts for sessions, I find that using a clean MIDI guitar patch such as the "Jazz Guitar" patch from the GM bank is a good way to go.

*HAMMER-ONS AND PULLOFFS may not track well with the GK pickup system. While I have found that the thicker the strings on the guitar, the better the MIDI pickup system will track (my old jap strat that ha the GK on it is running 12 or 13 on top...) there is still a slight limitation as to what the MIDI pickup can reasonably handle. Not a big deal to me after beconming familiar with the setup, sometimes I simply pick every note from a passage and then manually Edit the results to indicate hammerons, pulloffs, the slur indicator, etc.

*There are MIDI pickup systems that can track much better and faster than the Roland syzstem, but they tend to cost ten times the entry price of the Roland. So to record fast passages and such with the Roland GK system, I find it better to temporarily set the MIDI host program (such as Band in a Box, Realband, Powertracks, Sonar, etc. ) Tempo to a slower BPM setting than the target and record the whole thing at a speed slow enough to allow for good MIDI note tracking. You can find out what that would be for your setup with a bit of experimentation. After the recording is done, just reset the Tempo where it is supposed to be for a good playback.


*DON'T EXPECT TO FIND ULTIMATE JOY IN THE FIRST HOUR OR EVEN THE FIRST DAY. I found that it was necessary to treat the MIDI guitar setup as if it were a brand new instrument (to me) that happened to be controlled in much the same fashion as my guitar, but with a slightly different set of parameters that I had to become used to. There will be a bit of the unfamiliar there, easily concquered via the repetition of practice with the MIDI system. So I do recommend that you look forward to a certain amount of time for you to go through what I like to call a "ahakedown" period with the new equipment and software. The end result is well worth it, but perhaps far too many, expecting instant and stellar results, perhaps expecting the setup to perform pretty much like an audio pickup would, try the thing for too short a time and then become disgruntled. Practicing with the thing in order to become accustomed to the differences in playing style needed to get good MIDI tracking, plus a few other things that have to happen there, is the way to go.


--Mac
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#166124 - 07/20/12 03:01 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: Mac]
bowlesj Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 07/01/12
Posts: 359
Hi Mac,

Thanks for a detailed and great response.

I guess the better tracking systems you mention are the piezo RMC and Ghost systems. I was looking at those. I was thinking of buying one then I had to give myself a reality check on the cost relative to how much time I have available to write on top of practicing. This whole idea of getting a Midi input came from wanting to get a nice printout of about 30 old songs I wrote then getting interested in writing again. Back then I had the time. Now I don't (at least not as much).

So, from what you are saying about the "Midi 5Pin to USB adapter", it sounds like my two theories as to where the driver comes from are true. It is just nice to hear a few confirmations. Interesting to know about the one for sale here.

Thanks again,
John


Edited by bowlesj (07/20/12 03:02 PM)
_________________________
John Bowles
My playing in my 20s:
https://www.reverbnation.com/johnbowles

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#166125 - 07/20/12 03:48 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: bowlesj]
allis Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 12/04/04
Posts: 603
Loc: Pennsylvania, USA
Quote:

...where the driver comes from...




The good plain MIDI adapters are detected automatically and drivers are installed by Windows, as Mac says. I think that's better than using proprietary drivers, because class-compliant devices don't leave you high and dry when a new Windows version comes along, and the manufacturer ceases to support last year's interface.

The expensive ($40) MIDI-USB interfaces are more durable than cheap ones, but junky-looking $6 ones from eBay work every bit as well, at least until you step on the crackly part.
_________________________
Larry
______

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#166126 - 07/20/12 04:49 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: allis]
Larry Kehl Offline
Veteran

Registered: 06/04/00
Posts: 2051
Loc: New Mexico
as usual Mac hit all the points - so heed his words.

I've been using a Roland GR-50 since they came out (2 years before the GR-1) and initially my GK-2 was on a Jap Start as well. I REGRET ever trading that guitar for a Fender Roland ready Start that Jap Strat was a better guitar/Strat then the MIM Roland Ready Strat by a mile! But I have other MIDI guitars now as well (and they do get $$$)

But that aside, I still have the GR-50 and it was my first synth or MIDI anything - so I learned MIDI and synths from there. Over 20+ years later, and even with high end, $$$ faster tracking systems, you STILL have to play CLEANLY and approach it as if it were its own instrument.

I assume you already have the GR-1 by now. BUT I would ALSO recommend looking at the "You Rock Guitar" (a USB MIDI controller ) as a BETTER MIDI controller (less than $140 street price). Don't turn your nose up because it looks like a "Rock Band" and "Guitar Hero" toy. And full disclosure IT IS used for games like these on Wii, PS, xBox. Fret finger vibrato and palm mute are a few things that it can't do (these DO work on any guitar you put the GK-2 on, or my RRS, or Parker, etc. guitars) .

just a few of many videos out there (listen to last one first)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31JOeS-9EWk&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKcKQb_aywM&feature=fvwrel

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SUSRUPw1S0I&feature=relmfu

Good luck

Larry
_________________________
Win7&10 Pro 64,i7-2600k,32GB,1OTBs HDD,RX480 8GB,FW-410,MIDIplus4x4,Montage7,Fusion 8HD,QS8,GR-50,Integra7, XV5080,Fantom-XR,QSR,SC-8850,Nanosynth,SPLAT,AD2,ST3,Kontakt 5,Amptube4,way too many other VSTi's - but I'm really a guitar player

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#166127 - 07/20/12 05:25 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: bowlesj]
megafiddle Offline
Apprentice

Registered: 07/08/12
Posts: 103
Loc: Fred'burg VA
Quote:

I am curious. Did you play bass before you started Midi or the other way around? It would be interesting to find someone who got interested in Midi before playing an instrument unless they were already a programmer and assigned that type of job.




First off, sorry to hear about the misrepresented GK pickup. Good that you didn't have to make the drive just to find that out, at least.

I was already playing bass, started around 1970. Started guitar even before that in the '60s. I played bass in a few working bands in the 70's, but when the bands stopped, I didn't play bass much except for a little practice. So I got interested in synthesizers and sequencers so I could do more work with chords and multipart harmonies. I get a lot more playing done when working with sequences and BAIB.

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#166128 - 07/20/12 07:08 PM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: megafiddle]
bowlesj Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 07/01/12
Posts: 359
Thanks Guys.

I have to say that the "You Rock Guitar" for pure writing is one heck of a short cut. Some of the demos sound pretty good actually. Not so great for capturing the occasional great lick that shows up during a live jam with a favorite real guitar but you can't complain about the price. I should price it locally.

I may ask the guy who has the GR-1 if he will sell it alone and I would just get a new GK-3 for the Gibson. I probably should recommend he change his link to one that points to the GK-2A.

John
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John Bowles
My playing in my 20s:
https://www.reverbnation.com/johnbowles

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#166129 - 07/21/12 08:24 AM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: bowlesj]
Mac Offline
Veteran

Registered: 05/29/00
Posts: 38502
Loc: Chesapeake, Virginia USA
There's got to be millions of GR-1s scattered about, his is not the only one. Check ebay, as well as other resources -- and do not pay too much money for one!



--Mac
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#166130 - 07/22/12 10:04 AM [Band-in-a-Box for Windows] Re: Easiest way to test Midi input signal [Re: Mac]
bowlesj Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 07/01/12
Posts: 359
Thanks Mac.
I have just set up a routine to do a daily search in a few places like E-bay and Kijjii.

I am curious. I have not been getting email notices of posts to this thread. I double checked my email address and it is correct (figured it would be since I got the email for the signup confirmation process). I set my emails to yes in the following.

Do you want all replies to your favorite topics emailed to you?

I just noticed at the bottom of this response box there is a "Add this thread to my favorites.". Okay I am going to take a guess that I have to check that off first. I will do it right now to see what happens. If it works is there not a way to make it so that when we create a post we automatically get email notice of replies (that is the standard with forums generally if we want email notice).

I did find the favorite toggle at the very bottom of any thread. Now that makes sense since we are not going to want email from all of them but normally it would be assumed that the ones we create we want email for.

Anyway, not a problem. I adapt.


Edited by bowlesj (07/22/12 10:10 AM)
_________________________
John Bowles
My playing in my 20s:
https://www.reverbnation.com/johnbowles

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